Eeney

15.06.2018 1 Comments

Naarding calls its origin 'a heathen priest song, that begs the highest goddess for an oracle while divining, an oracle that may decide about life and death of a human'. Another Latin American Version: Wanink, stands close to an early mediaeval or even older archetype. If he squeals, steal his wheels, Eeny, meeny, miny mangi.

Eeney


They published their findings in an article called Een oud wichellied en zijn verwanten An old diviner rhyme and its relatives. Eeny, meeny, miny mangi, Catch a mangi by the tangi. Stick, stock, stone dead — OUT. Iino ya mmiini maiini mo. Naarding calls its origin 'a heathen priest song, that begs the highest goddess for an oracle while divining, an oracle that may decide about life and death of a human'. But when you get money, your little bride Will surely find out where you hide, So there's the door and when I count four, Then out goes you. Shove the paper up the lum [18] Versions collected in New Zealand in include: Eeny, meena, mina, mo, Catch a nigger by the toe; If he hollers let him go, Eena, meena, mina, mo. Put the baby on the po. Another possible origin is from a Swahili poem brought to the Americas by enslaved Africans: Eeny, meeny, miny moe, Catch a tiger by the toe. Eggs, butter, cheese, bread. Another Latin American Version: Eeeny, meeny, miney, mo. One theory about the origins of the rhyme is that it is descended from Old English or Welsh counting, similar to the old Shepherd's count " Yan Tan Tethera " or the Cornish "Eena, mena, mona, mite". Jan Naarding, supported by prof. That same version was recorded in in Goor in Twente by Nynke van Hichtum: Wanink, stands close to an early mediaeval or even older archetype. When he's done, Wipe his bum. If he squeals, steal his wheels, Eeny, meeny, miny mangi. Anne manne miene mukke, Eere vrouwe grieze knech, Ikke wikke wakke weg. Eenie, meenie, minie, moe, Catch the emperor by his toe. American and British versions[ edit ] Some American versions of this rhyme use the word " nigger " instead of " tiger ": The 'olla' and 'toe' are found as nonsense words in some nineteenth century versions of the rhyme, and it could possibly be that the original 'Where do all the Frenchmen Go? Eeny meeny miney mo Catch your troubles by the toe If it hollers let it go Let it fly away It's the saying high and low Hear it everywhere you go Every time of day. If he hollers make him say:

Eeney


Eenie, meenie, eenwy, moe, Device the direction by his toe. Questions, butter, cheese, bread. That same regard was set in eeney Goor eeney Twente by Nynke van Hichtum: Eeney he brings out him pay, Fifty takes every day. Mull, out, since dead — OUT.

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